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That's Brilliant! How To Turn A Beer Can Into The Only Camping Stove You’ll Ever Need

You can whip one of these up in a matter of minutes. They’re so easy to make and they work really well. First find yourself some scissors and a beverage can and then start the above video. This is an inexpensive way to be prepared in the event of a power outage as these stoves give off a lot of heat and have the ability to cook large meals. They also make great holiday gifts for friends and family.


That's Brilliant! How To Turn A Beer Can Into The Only Camping Stove You’ll Ever Need

Source: Real Farmacy
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That's Brilliant! How To Turn A Beer Can Into The Only Camping Stove You’ll Ever Need That's Brilliant! How To Turn A Beer Can Into The Only Camping Stove You’ll Ever Need Reviewed by Eli Snow on 5:43 AM Rating: 5

8 comments

  1. Excellent.
    Does it work with Methylated Spirits?

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  2. Bravo...always nice to learn something new and such a great camping or road survival stove! Thanks and a wonderful video to boot!

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  3. Also if you have no pocket knife
    http://life.hackaday.com/three-ways-to-open-a-can-without-a-can-opener/

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  4. I've used a $15 alcohol SafeSport (or some such brand) stove for 20 years! This can stove is almost identical and looks amazing. I might suggest, in addition to a windscreen others have mentioned, that you buy or improvise a pot stand that the stove will fit into, rather than putting the pot directly on the can. One is often cooking on soft and/or uneven surfaces when outside, and the stove is inherently unstable with a pot on it. Spilling that last cup of cocoa or pot of hot food in the backcountry can be a real bummer!

    Other advantages aside from cheapness and lightness: dependability (no pumps or valves to clog or leak, burns decently at altitude) and safety (no pressurized canisters, again no leaking valves or connectors). Also, alcohol burns comparatively cleanly and cool; I was cooking in my tent in a blizzard at 10-11,000 feet, and turned the stove over on my backpack. I was able to quickly beat out the flames with a glove, and no damage occurred to the nylon of the backpack or the glove. It does give off fumes, depending on what alcohols you are burning (methyl vs. ethyl vs. ispropyl vs. mixed), but the burn is much cleaner than that from petroleum.

    Good luck. I hope to make one or two of these soon and cook up multiple water batches at once!

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  5. While fun to make, these are a waste of time when it comes to actual backpacking. They need to be primed and are not so reliable (or safe)- also you still have to carry liquid fuel that it's hard to judge how much you need.
    You can get a cheap ultralight (4oz or so) backpacking stove for under $20 that use small butane canisters that are only $5.
    Bottom line: invest in a decent stove.

    ReplyDelete

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