Posted by Snow Addicted Friday, August 9, 2013

Abraham Lake is an artificial lake on North Saskatchewan River in western Alberta, Canada. Is home to a rare phenomenon where bubbles get frozen right underneath its surface. They're often referred to as ice bubbles or frozen bubbles. This has made the lake famous among photographers. Photographer Fikret Onal explains the phenomenon: "The plants on the lake bed release methane gas and methane gets frozen once coming close enough to much colder lake surface and they keep stacking up below once the weather gets colder and colder during [the] winter season."

Frozen Air Bubbles in Abraham Lake, Alberta Canada

“Even though I've walked on a frozen lake before on every occasion, the frozen Abraham Lake made me feel completely uneasy since the lake was not covered with snow (it was too cold to snow, below -30 Celsius with wind chill). Even though the icy surface was around 8-9 inches thick, it still scared the hell out of me not only because of the fact that I can see all the cracks in all directions everywhere and to see the darkness of the lake bottom through the glassy surface, also the deep boomy, underwater and cracking sounds coming from the underneath of the lake surface…”

Frozen Air Bubbles in Abraham Lake, Alberta Canada 1

Frozen Air Bubbles in Abraham Lake, Alberta Canada 2

Frozen Air Bubbles in Abraham Lake, Alberta Canada 3

Frozen Air Bubbles in Abraham Lake, Alberta Canada 4

Frozen Air Bubbles in Abraham Lake, Alberta Canada 5
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{ 4 comments... read them below or Comment }

  1. "Too cold to snow" is a fallacy. I forget the coldest temp recorded during a snowfall, in Siberia, but it was far colder than -30 degrees C.

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    Replies
    1. I've lived in northern Manitoba all my life and it doesn't snow once it's colder than around -25 degrees Celsius

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    2. It can't snow when it becomes too cold as the air can not hold enough moisture. Any snow that is in the air is probably due to wind blowing it in from the surrounding areas. That's why there is so little snow that falls in Antarctica or the Arctic. Besides, -40 is nothing in Alberta.

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  2. Those are not actual photographs--they may have been at one time but the airbrushing-photoshopping or whatever photo app this guy used has totally altered-disfigured-and misrepresented what at one time were probably nice (not amazing-not spectacular) photos and made them look like caricatures

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